MINSOCAM

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MINSOCAMMineralogical Society of America
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The Mineralogical Society of America has been publishing this series of reviews for nearly 30 years beginning with the initial volume in 1974 on sulfide minerals.
He was a Life Fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and the Geological Society of America, and an honored member of many other professional organizations.
You can read about the history of these early journals in the article "Arthur Chamberlain and his magazines, " published in vol.1, no.1, of The American Mineralogist (July 1916), and now available online at the Mineralogical Society of America's website: http://www.minsocam.org/msa/collectors_corner/arc/his1.htm
The 27th Annual Mineralogical Symposium, sponsored by the Mineralogical Society of America, the Friends of Mineralogy, and the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society, will be held on Saturday, February 11, 2006, at the Tucson Convention Center.
A member, both regular and honorary, of many organizations, including the Mineralogical Society of America, Lou was always willing to lend a hand or a specimen to fellow micromounters.
Richard was a founding member, and first president, of the Friends of Mineralogy, a life fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America, and a member of the Arizona Geological Society.
This event, which was held Sunday and Monday, February 10 and 11, was supported by six organizations, the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society, the Friends of Mineralogy, the Mineralogical Society of America, the Mineralogical Record, the Mineral Museums Advisory Council and the University of Arizona.
The 24th Annual Tucson Mineralogical Symposium, sponsored by the Mineralogical Society of America, the Friends of Mineralogy, and the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society, will be held on Saturday, February 15, 2003 at the Tucson Convention Center.
In 1960, now a Captain in the Navy, he was elected a Fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America, and in 1961 retired from the Navy after 25 years of service.
Richard was a long-time member of the New York Mineralogical Club, a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America, a member of the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain, the Mineralogical Association of Canada, the Society of Economic Geologists, and served as president of the second oldest United States mineral society, The Philadelphia Mineralogical Society.
Department of Interior and the Roebling medal of the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA).