MINI

(redirected from Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview)
AcronymDefinition
MINIMini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview
MINIMonitor Environment Initialization
MINIMental Illness Needs Index
MINIMorang Innovative Neonatal Intervention (Nepal)
MINIMultivariate Indicator of Nitrogen Imbalance (agronomy)
MINIMicro and Nanotechnology Initiative (International Space University)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The enrolled patients, 18-55 years old, were diagnosed by validated Chinese version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, Version 5.0).[22] Patients were included if the following criteria were met: diagnosis of MDD based on MINI according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-Text Revision, first-episode or relapse, and inpatients or outpatients.
The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used in the present study for identifying the comorbide disorders on Axis I and for assessing the suicidal risk: low, moderate, high, as in the MINI Module C--Suicide ideas.
The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) : the development and validation of a structured diagnostic psychiatric interview for DSM-IV and ICD10.
Subsequently, the company had the 429 respondents check themselves using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I), a short structured diagnostic interview developed in 1990.
Participants in either group were not included if they had history/present symptoms of dementia as examined through mini-mental status examination score <24, psychological/neuropsychiatric disorder as assessed through mini-international neuropsychiatric interview, major medical conditions cancer, thyroid function, stroke, head trauma, coronary heart disease, and visual/hearing impairment as assessed by clinical examination.
A diagnostic assessment was conducted using the validated Chinese version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) version 5.0 to establish the DSM-IV diagnoses of MDD and BD-I or BD-II.
A clinical research coordinator also evaluated each participant for PTSD and other Axis I disorders using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview at baseline and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-month follow-up visits.
At baseline, all of the study participants underwent a psychiatric and general medical evaluation, including a medical history, psychiatric history, and family psychiatric history A clinical research coordinator also evaluated each participant for PTSD and other Axis I disorders using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview at baseline and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-month follow-up visits.
Mean [+ or -] SD Variable or % n Age 39.0 [+ or -] 9.5 -- Male 59 175 Hispanic 45 132 African American 38 112 Caucasian 18 53 Veteran 5 15 Welfare/SSI/SSD 70 207 Currently in MMTP 22 66 Any Lifetime Physical/Sexual Abuse 50 146 Chronic Medical Health Problem 39 114 Substance-Use Disorder (past yr) * 49 145 PTSD * 46 135 CSP ([dagger]) 40 118 Both PTSD and CSP 24 71 Neither PTSD nor CSP 38 113 Any Prior Mental Health Treatment 89 263 Any Prior Substance-Use Treatment 71 209 Any Drug/Alcohol Use 64 189 (past 30 d) ([double dagger]) Any Stressful Life Events 95 280 Total Stressful Life Events 8.0 [+ or -] 4.3 -- * Per Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Source: Sheehan DV, Lecrubier Y, Sheehan KH, Amorim P, Janavs J, Weiller E, Hergueta T, Baker R, Dunbar GC.
The inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) Age 18-65 years; (b) a positive response ("yes") to the Mini-international Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (Sheehan et al ., 1998) question A1 (depressed mood) and/or A2 (loss of interest), and (c) a diagnosis of MDD according to the DSM-IV criteria (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
Mental health disorders, suicide risk, and physical and mental functioning were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus (MINI-Plus) and the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), she reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.
The routine use of a structured diagnostic interview such as the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus) is of great value in highlighting the inconsistencies that suggest psychiatric misdiagnosis, he added.