MIHR

(redirected from Mining Industry Human Resources)
AcronymDefinition
MIHRMining Industry Human Resources (Canada)
MIHRCentre for Management of Intellectual Property in Health Research and Development
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR) released the 2019 Canadian Mining Labour Market Outlook Report on Nov.
The Mining Industry Human Resources Council report "Canadian Engineers for Tomorrow--Trends in Engineering Enrollment and Degrees Awarded 2009-2013" shows that across Canada, mining and minerals engineering programs are the fastest growing engineering disciplines.
It was developed in concert with the Assembly of First Nations and the Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR), with curriculum input from educators and industry.
Tookenay applied and was accepted to the program which is administered by the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, the Anishinabek Employment and Training Services and the Assembly of First Nations.
Redpath; Chris Hodgson, president of the OMA; Joshua DeBenedet, Stantec; Roy Slack, president of Cementation; Tom Palangio, president of WipWare; Laurentian University professors Garaham Spiers and Peter Beckett; and Ziad Saab, of Mining Industry Human Resources.
Workforce Planning Boards across the North are teaming up with the Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR) on a pan-northern research project to forecast the current and future needs of the mining industry.
The report was a collaboration between the North Superior Workforce Planning Board and the Mining Industry Human Resources Council.
The Mining Industry Human Resources Council recently reported that finding experienced and skilled workers is becoming more difficult for the industry.
Developed by the Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR) and members of industry the program is the cornerstone of the mining industry's efforts to recognize the skills, knowledge and experience of its workforce.
The Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR) launched the Canadian Mining Industry Employment and Hiring Forecasts 2010 report in an effort to estimate the manpower needs required by the mining industry as the wave of baby boomers reaches retirement.
Despite a sluggish economy, one report said there is, and will continue to be, competition for skilled labour in the mining industry Last August, the Mining Industry Human Resources Council said through attrition and regular movement in the labour market, Ontario's mining sector will need 11,300 new workers over the next decade.
Ontario's nearterm future for mining jobs may seem gloomy, but a recently released labour report by the Mining Industry Human Resources Council (MiHR) indicates that as many as 17,000 workers will be needed in the province by 2018.
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