MOI

(redirected from Molecules of Interest)
AcronymDefinition
MOIMinistry of Information (various locations)
MOIMoment Of Inertia
MOIMinistry of Investment (various locations)
MOIMoment of Inspiration (3D modeling software)
MOIMethod of Instruction
MOIMedium of Instruction (education)
MOIMothers of Invention (band)
MOIMultiplicity of Infection
MOIMolecules of Interest
MOIMethod of Implementation
MOIMen of Integrity (ministry)
MOIMethod of Inspection (various companies)
MOIMinistry of the Interior
MOIMinistry of Industry (Vietnam)
MOIMechanism Of Injury
MOIMechanism of Injury (medical reports)
MOIMine of Information
MOIMemorandum of Intent
MOIMen of Issachar (ministry)
MOIMemorandum of Information
MOIMars Orbit Insertion
MOIMemorandum Of Instruction
MOIModel Identification
MOIMarine Officer Instructor
MOIMode of Inheritance (genetics)
MOIMemorandum of Insurance
MOIMode of Infection
MOIMultiple on Investment (finance)
MOIMeteorological Organization of Iran
MOIMinority Owned Institution
MOImoiety of infection
MOIMedical Optical Imaging
MOIMaintenance Operating Instruction
MOIMachine Operating Instructions
MOIMessage of Intent
MOIMilitary Occupational Information
MOIMissing on Induction
MOIManner of Infection
MOIMode of Inoculation
MOIModern Optical Instrumentation (China State Key Laboratory)
MOIMost Outstanding Intern
MOIMitcham Orchestra Inc. (South Australia)
MOIMedia of Inspection
MOIManner of Inoculation
MOIMarketing Operations Interface
MOIMachinery Operation Instruction
MOIModel Operating Instruction
MOIMessage Of Operational Intent
References in periodicals archive ?
Biomimetic lipid bilayers, representing natural cell membranes, will be supported on the arrays and the interaction of drug molecules of interest monitored via metal enhanced fluorescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance.
These specimens are provided ready-to-use, enabling the immediate study of molecules of interest and eliminating the need for time-consuming in-house sample collection and preparation.
Sederma is not only about developing natural molecules of interest for the cosmetic industry.
The researchers engineered an oily coating that traps and smoothly transports molecules of interest through nanopores.
However, the Los Alamos researchers have yet to work out the details of how to tag DNA and other molecules of interest.
This coating also puts out molecular "hooks" to bind molecules of interest during the separation.