M6G

(redirected from Morphine-6-glucuronide)
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AcronymDefinition
M6GMorphine-6-Glucuronide (molecule)
M6GMorphine-6beta-Glucuronide
References in periodicals archive ?
Morphine-3-glucuronide has no analgesic effect, but morphine-6-glucuronide is an active metabolite and is more potent than morphine as an analgesic.
The phase-II enzyme UGT2B7 is involved in the conversion of morphine into morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and the active metabolite morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), with a formation ratio of 9:1.
stated that morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), active metabolites of morphine, were revealed in large amounts after IV administration of morphine.
morphine-3-glucuronide, but only UGT2B7 formed morphine-6-glucuronide.
In addition, in some cases glucuronidation was reported to have pharmacological effect (such as morphine-6-glucuronide, digitoxin- and digoxin-glucuronides) and may be associated with toxicity (such as N-O-glucuronides and the acyl glucuronides) [27].
Morphine is commonly avoided in such patients because of the risk of accumulation of metabolites, in particular morphine-6-glucuronide, which is also excreted by the kidneys and is a more potent mu-opioid agonist than morphine (2).
Influence of renal failure on the disposition of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide in sheep during intravenous infusion with morphine.
When consumed, heroin is rapidly transformed to 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), then to morphine, which in turn is mainly metabolized to morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and, to a lesser extent, to morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G).
The resultant metabolite is normally inactive, although there are exceptions to this, such as morphine-6-glucuronide, which has stronger analgesic effect than morphine itself.
Gong Q, Hedner T, Hedner J, Bjorkman R, Nordberg G (1991) Antinociceptive and ventilatory effects of the morphine metabolites: morphine-6-glucuronide and morphine-3-glucuronide.
Analgesic effects of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in a transcutaneous electrical pain model in healthy volunteers.