NAMIA

AcronymDefinition
NAMIANational Association of Mutual Insurance Agents (now National Association of Professional Insurance Agents, Inc.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Namia thus is the first kingdom where home-schooling not only is encouraged, but required.
The trend continued, and in the 1970s NAMIA changed its name to the National Assn.
Living in a large, old house they stumble across the magical kingdom of Namia through the back of a wardrobe while playing hide and seek.
James Martin saying that The Golden Compass and other works of Philip Pullman are being marketed as if they were The Chronicles of Namia but they are more like the best selling antireligion book God Is Not Great, How Religion Poisons Everything
The event theme was "Namia", which was echoed in the vodka iced cocktails in a winter wonderland, with extravagant floral decorations, Asian projections and a frosty haze.
As head of production, she oversaw such hits as Pirates of the Caribbean II: Dead Man's Chest and The Chronicles of Namia as well as misses like The Alamo.
Follow the adventures of Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter as step into the magical wardrobe and enter the world of Namia.
NAMIA dropped the "mutual" from its name and became the Professional Insurance Agents of America, thereby widening its own minimized embrace.
Namia acquired more than 3,000 square meters of property in Green Meadows, Quezon City.
Meanwhile, Joselito Namia of Nabua town and Eric Escolano of Naga City fought it out with police and were killed at a drug buy-bust in Barangay Dolorosa in Nabua at 4:40 p.m.
Thomas Estrella, 66; Lamberto Malazzab, 64; Dante Gammag, 64; Tito Baniel, 56; David Malazzab, 49; Pablito Onate, 64; Paz Malazzab, 52; Leoncia Tamanu, 70; Roselily Gammag, 58; Natividad Siriban, 62; Peter Sibbaluca, 54; Dexter Tamaray 34; Benjamin Silva Jr., 31; Lester Suyu, 29; Cris Ivan Ravelo, 34; Jesus Mamba, 63; Elvie Chavente, 43; Nelia Namia, 45;
Maria Tatar, who teaches children's literature at Harvard University, describes books like The Chronicles of Namia, The Wind in the Willows, The Jungle Books, and Pinocchio as "setting minds into motion, renewing senses, and almost rewiring brains," or, as William Wordsworth wrote: "What we have loved/others will love, and we will teach them how."