NAOJ

AcronymDefinition
NAOJNational Astronomical Observatory of Japan
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References in periodicals archive ?
The NAOJ and other astronomical organizations called on companies to use materials that do not reflect as much sunlight and to adjust the types of radio waves they use, among other actions.
"When I checked the ALMA data for the first time, I was really excited because the observed gas showed obvious orbital motions, which strongly suggest an invisible massive object lurking," Shunya Takekawa, an astrophysicist at the NAOJ told New Scientist.
In 1986 he moved to Tokyo Astronomical Observatory of the University of Tokyo, which was reformed as National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) in 1988.
Cray said that NAOJ, a premier centre for numerical simulation in astronomy, is using the new Cray XC30 supercomputer to run complex simulations allowing researchers to reproduce and observe astronomical phenomena in a virtual environment.
Set at 5,000 meters above sea level in the Chilean Andes, ALMA is a massive radio telescope developed through a partnership among East Asia (led by NAOJ), North America and Europe.
Junichi Watanabe, a professor at the NAOJ, told Kyodo News: "This kind of footage is rarely filmed."
That is, the possible period for air-drying with minor surface checking averages 2.2 months per year, which is only 4.1 percent of the total number of potential drying months available for the 80 cities studied (NAOJ 1999).
(EDS: BINARY SYSTEM CAN BE SEEN AT http://subarutelescope.org/Latestnews/200201/AO_IRCS/fig4.gif AT NAOJ'S WEB SITE)
Takuma Izumi, a researcher at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), led a team of astronomers that used ALMA to observe the supermassive black hole in the Circinus Galaxy located 14 million light-years away from the Earth in the direction of the constellation Circinus.
The project is managed by the author at The University of Tokyo, NAOJ, and NINS.
Recent near-infrared (*2) observations with the NAOJ Subaru Telescope revealed that protoplanetary disks have structures that are far more complex than we expected.