NASA-TLX

AcronymDefinition
NASA-TLXNational Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index
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References in periodicals archive ?
Peppermint odor significantly reduced perceived physical workload, temporal workload, effort, and frustration, as assessed by the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair, Lorr & Droppleman, 1971) and the NASA-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX; Hart & Staveland, 1988).
After completing five blocks, participants responded to the NASA-TLX for the Hand x Device condition that they had just completed.
Although the NASA-TLX is a convenient and reliable instrument for measuring mental workload, it is essentially a subjective scale (Warm et al., 1996), and there is always some question as to whether any form of self-report accurately reflects respondents' "true" perceptual experiences (Natsoulas, 1967).
TABLE 1: Means (and Standard Deviations) for the RMSE Tracking Scores for the Six Experimental Conditions Group Feedback Adaptive Automation Yoked Control Negative 5.8 (0.98) 10.7 (1.21) 10.2 (0.97) Positive 11.3 (l.12) 11.4 (1.08) 10.6 (1.11) TABLE 2: Means (and Standard Deviations) for the NASA-TLX Scores for the Six Experimental Conditions Group Feedback Adaptive Automation Yoked Control Negative 43.0 (13.5) 84.0 (17.44) 90 (22.06) Positive 85.0 (14.25) 92.0 (24.05) 87 (18.38) TABLE 3: Means (and Standard Deviations) for the P300 Amplitudes to the Auditory Oddball Task for the Six Experimental Conditions Group Feedback Adaptive Automation Yoked Control Negative 4.40 (1.02) 2.20 (1.07) 2.18 (0.86) Positive 1.75 (0.76) 1.99 (0.57) 2.10 (0.84) REFERENCES
or Robertson et al.) that absentminded monitors perform as well on a traditional vigilance task as nonabsentminded monitors but rate that task as more mentally demanding on the NASA-TLX than do nonabsentminded individuals (Grubb et al., 1994).
Vigilance performance has been accompanied by high-workload scores on the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX; Warm, Dember, & Hancock, 1996) and by subjective reports indicating that monitors feel less energetic and more strained, bored, irritated, and drowsy and suffer more from headaches at the end of the vigil than they do at the beginning (Galinsky, Rosa, Warm, & Dember, 1993; Hovanitz, Chin, & Warm, 1989).
Immediately following the main vigil, half the male and female participants in each experimental group completed a computerized version of the NASA-TLX, a well-regarded instrument for assessing workload (Nygren, 1991).
Afterward they were asked to rate the workload for this task using the NASA-TLX.
Following the scenarios, subjective workload was elicited using an on-screen version of NASA-TLX. Seven situation awareness queries were then administered.
Nasa-TLX scores were used to evaluate difficulty levels of tasks completed.
NASA-TLX Questionnaire was administrated to identify the primary source of workload during the execution of the proposed AR-based simulation and to investigate workload levels of users with differing characteristics ("Profession/ Position Held," "Experience with AR" etc.).
Correlations across environments of NASA-TLX scale scores ranged from 0.22 to 0.51 and they were all statistically significant at p<0.05.