NCELA

AcronymDefinition
NCELANational Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition
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References in periodicals archive ?
States with the largest growth rates, over 200 percent, include Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Tennessee (NCELA, 2007).
NCELA frequently asked questions: How many school-aged English language learners (ELLs) are there in the U.S.?
Statistics available from the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition (NCELA, 2006) show that more than 10% of the K-12 student population across the United States is comprised of ELLs, which accounts for over five million students in our schools.
The National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition (NCELA) assisted OELA by forming a panel of experts and convening a "Roundtable on Teacher Education and Professional Development of ELL Content Teachers".
In that same decade, the states that saw the highest percentage growth rates of ELLs in the nation were South Carolina (688.2%), Arkansas (361.3%), Indiana (349.7%), North Carolina (346.2%), and Tennessee (296.0%) (NCELA, 2007b).
There are 15 states that do not require all teachers to have expertise or training in working with ELLs (NCELA, 2008).
This guide was produced by the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition and Language Instructional Educational Programs (NCELA).
The document also provides background for other NCELA documents in the Definitions for No Child Left Behind series: Scientifically-Based Research, Research and Evaluation that Work within NCLB Standards, and Criteria for Evaluating Evidence-Based Research.
Remarkably, however, even in states with available certification or endorsement, only 22 states require ESOL teachers to be ESOL-certified, and only 17 states have the equivalent requirement for bilingual teachers (NCELA, 2004).
These definitions, and those in the NCELA document "Definitions for No Child Left Behind: Assessment", also provide background for two others in the series: "Research and Evaluation that Works within NCLB Standards and Criteria for Evaluating Evidence-Based Research".
For the 1993-94 school year, the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition (NCELA) reported a national ELL student enrollment of 3,552,497.