NFWS

AcronymDefinition
NFWSNational Fox Welfare Society (UK)
NFWSNational Fund for Workforce Solutions (Boston, MA)
NFWSNavy Fighter Weapons School
NFWSNational Fixed Wireless Services (telecommunications)
NFWSNational Fish and Wildlife Service (US)
NFWSNational Ferret Welfare Society (UK)
NFWSNiagara Frontier Watercolor Society (New York)
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References in periodicals archive ?
This finding was significantly higher than that of the NFW households, of which none had OP levels greater than the 75th percentile (Table 2, p <0.001).
In 2005, 32% of FW households had N-methyl carbamate levels that were higher than the 75th percentile for OPs (4.63 nmol/g dust), which was significantly greater than the 9% of NFW households (Table 2, p = 0.02).
Additionally, the levels of synergist (Piperonyl Butoxide) detected in household dust were not statistically significantly different between 2005 and 2011 or between FW and NFW households and will not be discussed in detail.
In 2005, 3% of FW households showed boscalid levels greater than the 75th percentile of OPs (4.63 nmol/g dust, Figure 1), which is not significantly different from levels found in NFW households, none of which were greater than the 75th percentile of OPs (Table 2, p = 0.29).
Additionally, there were no statistically significant differences between study years or FW and NFW households in the levels of azole fungicides detected in household dust; thus, the azoles will not be discussed in further detail (Tables 2 and 3).
There were no statistically significant differences between study years or FW and NFW households for the ureas or the chlorophenoxy acids/ esters detected in household dust (Tables 2 and 3).
In 2005, no significant difference was found between the proportion of FW and NFW households that had TCS levels greater than the 75th percentile for OPs (4.63 nmol/g dust (Table 2, p = 0.48).
In 2005, 13% of FW households showed DGH levels greater than the 75th percentile for OPs (4.63 nmol/g dust), which is not significantly different from the 3% of NFW households (Table 2, p = 0.13).
In 2005, no significant difference was found between the proportion of FW households that had Na OPP levels greater than the 75th percentile for OPs (4.63 nmol/g dust) and the proportion of NFW households with pesticides above this level (Table 2, p = 0.31).
In this study, we examined more than 80 pesticides across different classes in FW and NFW homes in 2005 and 2011.
Declines in Pesticide Concentrations in Dust in FW and NFW Households
Thus, it would be expected that FW households would have a higher proportion of households with higher levels of these pesticides detected in their dust than NFW households would have.