NLAES

AcronymDefinition
NLAESNational Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2011 and 2012 NSDUH (SAMHSA 2013) include more current data, although these findings are not easily comparable with NLAES and NESARC.
DUI estimates using the 1991-1992 NLAES and 2001-2002 NESARC were also higher for Whites (6.4 to 5.0 percent) and Native Americans (4.2 to 5.9 percent), despite overall reductions in DUI for Whites during this time period (Chou et al.
This report also presents, for the first time, trends in the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence between 1991-1992 and 2001-2002 using the NIAAA NESARC and NIAAA's 1991-1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES) (Grant et al., 1994) as the baseline.
In contrast, Grant and Pickering (1996) used the NLAES data to examine the influence of current (12-month) alcohol and drug use disorders on current (12-month) alcohol and drug help-seeking.
The data reported in this paper show some interesting differences relative to earlier estimates of recovery based on the 1991-1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES).
population: the 1991-1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES, n = 42,862) and the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC, n = 43,093).
Finally, recent trends in young adult risk drinking are briefly examined by comparing the NESARC results with those from the 1991-1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES).
Previously, data from NIAAA's National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES) had shown that alcohol use early in life correlates strongly with the development of alcohol dependence later in life.
In the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES) of people ages 18 and older in the United States, people who reported starting to drink before the age of 15 were four times more likely to also report meeting the criteria for dependence at some point in their lives (Grant and Dawson 1998).
National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES) (Grant 1997) of 42,862 subjects, which was sponsored by NIAAA and conducted in the early 1990s.
One example of an expanded series of QF questions is the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES), sponsored and conducted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).
Evidence about the relationship between alcohol dependence and alcohol-related crashes is also available from the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES).