NYCDOE

AcronymDefinition
NYCDOENew York City Department of Education
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References in periodicals archive ?
"When Google Classroom first came out I did not like it," said a professional learning specialist from the NYCDOE's Division of Instructional and Information Technology.
Bajolo's working visa was sponsored by the NYCDOE. It was her husband who influenced her to come and teach abroad.
(76) Just last month, NYCDOE itself released extensive data about the 2010-2011 school year, leading to more discussion of correlations with race and special needs status, (77) as well as income status.
To answer these questions, we studied the five years (2005-2010) of suspension data provided to us by the NYCDOE. Although our analysis remains incomplete, the data reveal some intriguing correlations that invite further data-gathering and analysis.
I found GS formulations helped me to become more emotionally intelligent in my leadership roles with the NYCDOE. For example, when subordinates at staff meetings made self-serving comments rather than saying something useful for the task at hand, my first reaction was to become annoyed and to want to call them on their behavior.
* Educational Assistant A-I (P2) must have: a high school equivalency diploma; 6 appropriate college credits; one year of educational paraprofessional experience with the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE).
The school's enrollment is 4% White, 19.2% Black, 33.7% Hispanic, and 43.1% Asian and others (NYCDOE, 2005, p.2).
In 2010, New York City's Department of Education (NYCDOE) created the Innovation Zone (iZone) to try to accomplish just that.
While the study adds to previous research on So1 conducted by the Education Development Center for Children and Technology (CCT) and the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE), our study is the first independent evaluation of this new, expanding program.
This paper uses ethnographic data from research in three middle schools in Queens, New York and analyzes school choice publications created and distributed by the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) to answer questions about how the district and school-level communication strategies and materials facilitate and/or complicate Latin American immigrant families' understanding of the choice process.
In 2005, the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and its teachers union, the United Federation of Teachers (UFT), agreed to a groundbreaking contract that reformed outdated school staffing provisions.