NFOV

(redirected from Narrow Field Of View)
AcronymDefinition
NFOVNarrow Field Of View
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jim LR features a cooled thermal channel, with a 320 x 240 pixel sensor operating in the 3-5 pm band; the narrow field of view remains the same as the UCs, the wide one being of 9[degrees] x 6.75[degrees].
Most high-power mini binoculars have either a narrow field of view or short eye relief--or both.
When using the EPC, gunners should acquire targets using the TWS wide field of view and then switch to narrow field of view for firing.
Since I was using a lens with a narrow field of view and the rocket was drawing ahead of the payload, my system did not track as well as it should, which turned out to be fortunate.
Issues such as working distance, depth of field and narrow field of view are all very relevant to telescope users and translate as unnatural working ranges, some inconvenience and disorientation, which can result in a degree of fatigue.
The drones are looking down in a narrow field of view, he noted.
'It's a perception caused by the narrow field of view afforded by television,' he said.
The proposed observation would pose a challenge to Hubble because the orbiting telescope has an extremely narrow field of view. The persistent winds and radiation from massive stars cause the stars of older nurseries to disperse, so a full picture would have to cover a vast area.
That's fine for viewing the planets, and it's just big enough to see all of the Moon at once, but there are plenty of star clusters and nebulae that don't fit in such a narrow field of view. People who like exploring such deep-sky objects often care more about maximizing their field of view than about high magnification.
Second, the narrow field of view makes it easy for unwanted guests to step aside to avoid detection.
The SWD goggle has a relatively narrow field of view and a small interior volume that affords minimal room for eyeglass frames.
The closer birds crossed my narrow field of view in quick flashes; above them, hundreds, perhaps thousands, circled overhead in a single flock--a tornado of geese--and they were all headed into the set.