SSRN

(redirected from National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses)
AcronymDefinition
SSRNSocial Science Research Network
SSRNNational Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (US DHHS; Washington, DC)
SSRNScottish Stroke Research Network (UK)
SSRNSoft Switch Radio Network (Motorola)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce analysis of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN), 1980-2008; 2008 was the last year this survey was administered.
According to the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (n.d.), of RNs completing their initial RN education between 2005 and 2008, approximately 3% were prepared via a diploma program, 57% via an ADN, and 40% via a BSN.
Health Resources and Services Administration's National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (2008), an every-four-years snapshot of the nursing workforce, include the following:
The Registered Nurse Population: Findings from the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. Retrieved from: http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/rnsurvey/2008/
The registered nurse population: National sample survey of Registered Nurses March 2004: Preliminary findings.
* The average age of the RN population in the United States is 47 years, according to the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration.
PERCENTAGE OF PRACTICING NURSES BY AGE (Data from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, 2010) Less 25-34 21% 35-44 24% 45-54 31% 55-over 24% Note: Table made from pie chart.
The RN data from BLS Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) differs from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN--http://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/nursingsurvey.aspx conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).
The final report, The Registered Nurse Population: Findings from the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, released in late September, confirms the findings released earlier, i.e., the number of licensed RNs in the United States grew to a new high of 3.1 million between 2004 and 2008, and it adds more details with respect to that growth.
One sign of the problem was made clear in the US Department of Health and Human Service's National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (2004), showing that Oklahoma ranked 49th out of the fifty states for having the fewest number of nurses with graduate degrees proportional to the number of RNs.
The registered nurse population: Findings from the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. Retrieved from http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/rns urvey04/
Data from the latest National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (HRSA, 2010) indicate that nearly 73,000 RNs leave the profession annually due to retirement, child-rearing, returning to school, career change, death, or for other reasons.
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