nrj

(redirected from Newspaper Research Journal)
AcronymDefinition
nrjenergy
nrjNewspaper Research Journal (quarterly journal)
nrjNatural Resources Journal
nrjNouvelle Radio Jeunesse (French: New Youth Radio)
nrjNational Research Journal (periodical of the National Research Guild)
nrjNero Jukebox Compilation File (file extension)
References in periodicals archive ?
Valenti School of Communication at UH and principal investigator of the study, “Print Readers Recall More Than Do Online Readers,” published in Newspaper Research Journal.
HARDIN, M., CHANCE J., DODD J.E., HARDIN, B., 2002, Olympic Photo Coverage Fair to Female Athletes, Newspaper Research Journal, 23 (2) 64-79.
That failure might have serious implications for the quality of newspapers," Russial dryly concludes in an article published in the Newspaper Research Journal. (3)
"9/11 Attack Coverage Reveals Similarities, Differences." Newspaper Research Journal 24, no.
Last winter, in the quarterly Newspaper Research Journal, Edmonds of the Poynter Institute analyzed 178 papers with circulation over 50,000 and found that "on average, the public-company, private-chain, and independent-owned papers had virtually identical staffing ratios as groups."
EDITOR'S NOTE: This article is based on research published in the Fall 2004 issue of Newspaper Research Journal, in the article "Age, Wealth, Education Predict Letters to the Editor" by Bill Reader, Guido Stempel III of Ohio University, and Douglass K.
Something called "birth cohort replacement." At least that's the conclusion of an analysis published in the spring 2000 issue of the Newspaper Research Journal and written by Wolfram Peiser, a professor at the university of Mainz in Germany.
"Information Subsidies and Influence." Newspaper Research Journal, 11(3): 10-25.
A published author, Owens' has written “International News: What Makes College Students Want to Keep Reading?” for Newspaper Research Journal and “Network News: The Role of Race in Source Selection and Story Topic” for the Howard Journal of Communications.
By 1998, 95 percent were doing so, and an update to the study soon to be published in the Newspaper Research Journal will show that by 1999 the figure was nearly 100 percent, Garrison said.
It was published in the most recent issue of the quarterly Newspaper Research Journal.
Newspaper editors tend to overestimate readers' interest in crime, religion, business and local sports, according to a recently published study in the Newspaper Research Journal.