OIICS

AcronymDefinition
OIICSOccupational Injury and Illness Classification Structures (US Bureau of Labor Statistics)
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(15) Although, under the OIICS, electrocutions (a nature of injury) typically result from exposure to electricity (an event or exposure), there is no one-to-one correspondence between these two categories.
The OIICS manual identifies case circumstances in terms of an incident's "event or exposure," defined as "the manner in which the injury or illness was produced or inflicted by the source of injury or illness." (25) In that definition, the term "source" refers to "the objects, substances, equipment, and other factors that were responsible for the injury or illness." (26)
Beginning with workplace fatality data for 2011, CFOI case characteristics are classified using OIICS, version 2.01, which offers more detailed classifications of methods of suicide.
The event or exposure causing injury is classified according to the OIICS (5).
In the OIICS system, the event or exposure (such as fall to a lower level) describes the manner in which the injury or illness was produced or inflicted by the source of injury or illness.
In 2007, BLS began revising the OIICS. Over the course of 3 years, revision efforts focused on the evolving nature of the workplace, medical and technological advances, and feedback from data users, coders, and other stakeholders.
(8) The 2011 CFOI data were coded on the basis of OIICS version 2.01, whereas 2010 CFOI data were classified by the 2007 version of OIICS.
Number and percentage of excavation and trenching fatalities, by event--United States, 1992-2001 Event (OIICS * code) No.
In 1992, BLS introduced the Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS), a classification system used to describe all fatal injuries and the most severe nonfatal injuries and illnesses.
The BLS developed the Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS) to present a reliable set of procedures for recording the characteristics of workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities.