OPSY

(redirected from Organizational psychology)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
OPSYOrganizational Psychology
OPSYOunces Per Square Yard (fabrics)
References in periodicals archive ?
For those of us who are no psychologists, and have not been reading Volumes 1 through 9 of the series, Volume 10 of the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology might look more like a phone book on first glance than a book we would be excited about.
In addition, no doubt, not only all this party reflects the distribution of research work in occupational and organizational psychology, but also it is nevertheless difficult to believe that the inequality is as great as JOOP's pattern of submissions suggests.
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (1995) listing of graduate I/O programs indicates that only 22% of doctoral I/O programs, and 25% of master's I/O programs, require internships as part of their graduate training.
Taking both theoretical and empirical approaches, contributors from organizational psychology and economics explore the challenges of valuing workers at various points in their professional lives, from youth to retirement, as well as the benefits that arise from leveraging an age-diverse workforce.
Historical perspectives in industrial and organizational psychology.
Many human resource (HR) practitioners feel that academic research in occupational and organizational psychology is abstract and inconsequential; research often fails to address the practical issues of improving workforce performance and maintaining employee well-being, and is inadequate as a source of guidance.
The paper begins with a comparison of personnel and organizational psychology (their application to job analysis, job selection systems, and performance appraisals) and introduces the concept of workplace diversity psychology.
Work in the 21st century; an introduction to industrial and organizational psychology, 4th ed.
Garry Gelade (2006) has provided some challenging suggestions for how the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology (JOOP) might be made more relevant to practitioners.
Full browser ?