PAILS


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AcronymDefinition
PAILSPublications Automated Information Locator System
PAILSProjectile Air Burst & Impact Location System
References in classic literature ?
The good-looking young woman came into the outer room with the full pails dragging at her shoulders.
"Oh, if ye can swaller that, be it so," he said indifferently, while holding up the pail that she sipped from.
Messner broke the skin that had formed on the water-hole within the hour, and filled his pails. But he did not return immediately to the cabin.
There might have been another unpleasant quarrel between Aunt Em and Billina had not the men returned just then with their pails filled with clear, sparkling water.
It was, as I remember it, a lard pail, very wide across the top, and without a cover.
The teacher's desk and chair stood on a platform in one corner; there was an uncouth stove, never blackened oftener than once a year, a map of the United States, two blackboards, a ten-quart tin pail of water and long-handled dipper on a corner shelf, and wooden desks and benches for the scholars, who only numbered twenty in Rebecca's time.
Tod put down the pail beside the bed, took up the end of rope with the hook--hesitated, and looked at Tommy Brock.
He hit his son on the head with the empty pail. As it rolled clanging into the street, Jimmie began to scream and kicked repeatedly at his father's shins.
Instead of being permitted to concentrate his attention on his tragedy Nutty had to trudge three-quarters of a mile, conciliate a bull-terrier, and trudge back again carrying a heavy pail. It was as if one of the heroes of Greek drama, in the middle of his big scene, had been asked to run round the corner to a provision store.
He put down his pail, took the white alley, and bent over the toe with absorbing interest while the bandage was being unwound.
I ate my breakfast with pleasure and was about to remove a plank to procure myself a little water when I heard a step, and looking through a small chink, I beheld a young creature, with a pail on her head, passing before my hovel.
You've not learned your trade yet, Samson.' Then he led me into my box, took off the saddle and bridle with his own hands, and tied me up; then he called for a pail of warm water and a sponge, took off his coat, and while the stable-man held the pail, he sponged my sides a good while, so tenderly that I was sure he knew how sore and bruised they were.