PARSQ

AcronymDefinition
PARSQPara-Rescue
References in classic literature ?
An imp of evil, emblem and product of sin, she had no right among christened infants.
It was here that they made those products with the wonders of which they pestered him so--by placards that defaced the landscape when he traveled, and by staring advertisements in the newspapers and magazines--by silly little jingles that he could not get out of his mind, and gaudy pictures that lurked for him around every street corner.
Heat, however, will melt the proudest head and reduce to fiddling strings the finest product of the waving- pin; so anxious mothers were stationed over their offspring, waving palm-leaf fans, it having been decided that the supreme instant when the town clock struck ten should be the one chosen for releasing the prisoners from their self-imposed tortures.
The principal products raised upon it were tobacco, corn, and wheat.
Put this and that together, my tender pupil,' returned the wary Mowcher, touching her nose, 'work it by the rule of Secrets in all trades, and the product will give you the desired result.
To whom thus MICHAEL; These are the product Of those ill-mated Marriages thou saw'st; Where good with bad were matcht, who of themselves Abhor to joyn; and by imprudence mixt, Produce prodigious Births of bodie or mind.
The principle of buying laborforce in the cheapest market and selling its product in the dearest has done much to make Englishmen--what they are.
We left this island early the next morning, and soon came in sight of Cape Gardafui, so celebrated heretofore under the name of the Cape of Spices, either because great quantities were then found there, or from its neighbourhood to Arabia the Happy, even at this day famous for its fragrant products.
It was the natural output of a mind that had been led to assemble just the right materials for such a product.
She is the product of an Alchemy of such virtue that he who is able to practise it, will turn her into pure gold of inestimable worth.
Could that which procures a freer vent for the products of the earth, which furnishes new incitements to the cultivation of land, which is the most powerful instrument in increasing the quantity of money in a state -- could that, in fine, which is the faithful handmaid of labor and industry, in every shape, fail to augment that article, which is the prolific parent of far the greatest part of the objects upon which they are exerted?
We see, therefore, how the modern bourgeoisie is itself the product of a long course of development, of a series of revolutions in the modes of production and of exchange.