PGCG

AcronymDefinition
PGCGPeripheral Giant Cell Granuloma
PGCGProcess Gas Consumers Group
PGCGPresidium Gem Computer Gauge
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The microscopic features of the lesion were consistent with PGCG. A large number of stromal fibroblastic cells and multinucleated giant cells were seen.
DISCUSSION: Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) was first reported as fungus flesh in 1848, [12] then reported as giant cell reparative granuloma by Jaffe in 1953.
The PGCG occurs throughout life, with peaks in incidence during the mixed dentition period [11] and in the age group of 30-40 years.
The differential diagnosis of PGCG includes lesions with very similar clinical and histological characteristics, such as central giant cell granuloma, which are located within the jaw itself and exhibit a more aggressive behaviour.
Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, and PGCG were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test.
No stromal myofibroblasts were observed in FFH (Figure 1A), POF (Figure 1B), PG (Figure 1C), or PGCG (Figure 1D).
Although previous reports have detected myofibroblasts in PGCG, (19,21,22) no myofibroblasts were observed in the 10 PGCG samples evaluated in this study.
Table 1--Presence of stromal myofibroblasts in focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH), peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF), pyogenic granuloma (PG), and peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG).
Clinical appearance of PGCG can present as polyp- loidy or nodular lesion.
PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, though the later may suffer superficial erosion.8,9 PGCG may occur at any age but exhibits a peak incidence between 40 and 60 years of age.
Giant cell granuloma as (peripheral and central) are benign, non odonyogenic, moderately rare tumors of the oral cavity.7,10 PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the oral cavity, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane follow- ing local irritation or chronic trauma.9 PGCG arise interdentally or from the gingival margin, occur most frequently on the labial surface, and may be sessile or pedunculated.
The differential diagnosis of PGCG includes lesions with very similar clinical and histological characteris- tics, such as central giant cell granuloma, which are located within the jaw itself and exhibit a more aggres- sive behavior.5 Only radiological evaluation can estab- lish a distinction.