PLATO


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Related to PLATO: Aristotle, Socrates
AcronymDefinition
PLATOPhilosophy Learning and Teaching Organization
PLATOPortable Lights American Trade Organization (trade association)
PLATOProgrammed Logic for Automated Teaching Operations
PLATOProject for Learning Abroad, Training and Outreach (Loyola Marymount University)
PLATOParticipatory Learning and Teaching Organization (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
PLATOPredictive Latency-Aware Total Ordering
PLATOPermanent Large Array of Terrestrial Observatories
PLATOPlatform for Learning and Teaching Online (online course management)
References in classic literature ?
Nor are the reasonings of Schleiermacher, who argues that the Platonic defence is an exact or nearly exact reproduction of the words of Socrates, partly because Plato would not have been guilty of the impiety of altering them, and also because many points of the defence might have been improved and strengthened, at all more conclusive.
Plato is silent about his treachery to the ten thousand Greeks, which Xenophon has recorded, as he is also silent about the crimes of Critias.
Perhaps Plato may have been desirous of showing that the accusation of Socrates was not to be attributed to badness or malevolence, but rather to a tendency in men's minds.
as in the Lysis, Charmides, Laches, to the transcendentalism of Plato, who, in the second stage of his philosophy, sought to find the nature of knowledge in a prior and future state of existence.
The doctrines of Plato are necessarily different at different times of his life, as new distinctions are realized, or new stages of thought attained by him.
There is no reason to suppose that any of the Dialogues of Plato were written before the death of Socrates; the Meno, which appears to be one of the earliest of them, is proved to have been of a later date by the allusion of Anytus.
We cannot argue that Plato was more likely to have written, as he has done, of Meno before than after his miserable death; for we have already seen, in the examples of Charmides and Critias, that the characters in Plato are very far from resembling the same characters in history.
It is one of the most marked characteristics of Greek political theory that Plato and Aristotle think of the statesman as one who has knowledge of what ought to be done, and can help those who call him in to prescribe for them, rather than one who has power to control the forces of society.
Hence for Aristotle as for Plato, the natural state or the state as such is the ideal state, and the ideal state is the starting-point of political inquiry.
The existence of force is for Plato and Aristotle a sign not of the state but of the state's failure.
Those who have complete knowledge of the good must be few, and therefore Plato gave entire power in his state into the hands of the small minority of philosopher guardians.