POSTS


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AcronymDefinition
POSTSProgram on Science, Technology and Society (various universities)
POSTSPosterior Occipital Sharp Transients of Sleep (brain waves as seen on EEG)
References in classic literature ?
The Canadian traders, for a long time, had troublesome competitors in the British merchants of New York, who inveigled the Indian hunters and the coureurs des bois to their posts, and traded with them on more favorable terms.
These were distributed at various trading posts, established far and wide on the interior lakes and rivers, at immense distances from each other, and in the heart of trackless countries and savage tribes.
What are you coming for?" she said, letting fall the hand with which she had grasped the door post. And irrepressible delight and eagerness shone in her face.
And clutching at the cold door post, she clambered up the steps and got rapidly into the corridor of the carriage.
The old street sweeper at my elbow told me that these were the gifts brought in from the far outlying districts by the commanding officers of the frontier posts. The majority of them were women, destined, I was told, for the harems of the emperor and his favorites.
The American fur companies keep no established posts beyond the mountains.
Of course, a gentleman who finds a letter on the pavement feels bound to post it, and I presumed that he would naturally go to the nearest office.
Not a word of comment on the disaster of the morning escaped him when Magdalen returned and found him at his post. His flow of language seemed at last to have run dry.
"Only a picket post half a mile out, on the railroad, and a single sentinel at this end of the bridge."
For two days they had been engaged in reconnoitring the most favorable situation for a post at Gouina, when they became witnesses of Dr.
Why was it more strongly fortified than any other post? And why were all efforts exhausted and six thousand men sacrificed to defend it till late at night on the twenty-fourth?
Mademoiselle Stangerson went to the Post Office to get a letter, which Larsan says was written by Robert Darzac; for knowing nothing of what had passed at the Elysee, Larsan believes that it was Monsieur Darzac himself who stole the reticule with the key, with the design of forcing her consent, by getting possession of the precious papers of her father--papers which he would have restored to him on condition that the marriage engagement was to be fulfilled.