P/O

(redirected from Part of)
AcronymDefinition
P/OPurchase Order
P/OPart of
P/OPeace Out
P/OPer Occurrence
P/OPermit to Operate
P/OPhosphorous to Oxygen
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, some quantities are such that each part of the whole has a relative position to the other parts: others have within them no such relation of part to part.
But this was immediately opposed by Tom Bertram, who asserted the part of Amelia to be in every respect the property of Miss Crawford, if she would accept it.
I must entreat Miss Julia Bertram," said he, "not to engage in the part of Agatha, or it will be the ruin of all my solemnity.
To this purpose some of the vicious part of her life, which could not be modestly told, is quite left out, and several other parts are very much shortened.
Now as tragic imitation implies persons acting, it necessarily follows, in the first place, that Spectacular equipment will be a part of Tragedy.
Let these then be considered as the three distinct parts of a family: some think that the providing what is necessary for the family is something different from the government of it, others that this is the greatest part of it; it shall be considered separately; but we will first speak of a master and a slave, that we may both understand the nature of those things which are absolutely necessary, and also try if we can learn anything better on this subject than what is already known.
The Rivals" having been chosen as the play, Miss Marrable, as a matter of course, appropriated to herself the part of "Lydia Languish.
I suspect, also, that some of the cases of compensation which have been advanced, and likewise some other facts, may be merged under a more general principle, namely, that natural selection is continually trying to economise in every part of the organisation.
Question was asked of Demosthenes, what was the chief part of an orator?
In this part of Chile there are two passes across the Andes to Mendoza: the one most commonly used, namely, that of Aconcagua or Uspallata -- is situated some way to the north; the other, called the Portillo, is to the south, and nearer, but more lofty and dangerous.
This part of the existing hymn ends with an encomium of the Delian festival of Apollo and of the Delian choirs.
In the later part of the Middle Ages, also, there were the secular pageants, spectacular displays (rather different from those of the twentieth century) given on such occasions as when a king or other person of high rank made formal entry into a town.