PIFB

(redirected from Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology)
AcronymDefinition
PIFBPew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Resistance to genetically modified foods, technical difficulties, legal and business obstacles and the ability to develop improved foods without genetic engineering have winnowed the pipeline." While Pollack misses many of the nuances about the power, precision, and predictability of biotechnology applied to agriculture and food production, he devotes ample ink to anti-biotech activists, including the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology and the radical Friends of the Earth.
In the survey by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, 27% of U.S.
On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 = very uncomfortable to 10 = very comfortable), respondents rated their comfort level with engineering of plants at 6, microbes at 4.2, animals for food at 3.8, insects at 3.6, animals for other purposes at 2.2, and humans at 1.4 (Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, 2003).
National surveys have found varied consumer support for food biotechnology, ranging from a low of 25% to over 70% (Hoban 1997; IFIC 2003; Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology 2001; Shanahan, Scheufele, and Lee 2001; Shoemaker, Johnson, and Golan 2003).
The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology was established in March 2001 to provide the public, media and policymakers facts on agricultural biotechnology.
"By creating the platform for debate about agricultural biotechnology topics, the Initiative is giving the American public the opportunity to be well informed about developments in this industry and how such products are regulated," says Michael Rodemeyer, executive director, Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.
"OTA made a lot of enemies with that SDI report," says Michael Rodemeyer, a former minority legislative director of the House Science Committee, now executive director of the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.
While attracting some support, there are concerns that the US government has no clear regulatory framework, says a Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology report.
"As I was coming out here, I thought about making bumper stickers that say, 'Gene flow happens.'" The line gets a good laugh; after all, Rodemeyer, a director of the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology in Washington, D.C., is addressing a roomful of botanists.
A new report issued by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology says the labeling dispute over biotech foods could ignite a major trade war with the European Union and cost U.S.
10 report by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology in Washington, D.C.
Speaking October 24 at a Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology dialogue, Pew executive director Michael Rodemeyer said the United States and Europe appear to be on a collision course over the regulation of genetically modified food.