PIALP

(redirected from Pew Internet and American Life Project)
AcronymDefinition
PIALPPew Internet and American Life Project
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References in periodicals archive ?
In a survey of 12-17 year old adolescents, 84% reported owning at least one personal media device while 44% reported owning two or more devices (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2005).
Lee Raine, Susanna Fox, and Deborah Fallows, "The Internet and the Iraq War: How Online Americans Have Used the Internet to Learn War News, to Understand Events, and Promote Their Views," Pew Internet and American Life Project. http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Iraq_War_Report.pdf.
WASHINGTON -- Nearly two-thirds of American adults with Internet access have used it for spiritual or faith-related reasons, according to a study released April 7 by the Pew Internet and American Life Project.
Low-income Californians are just as likely as their wealthier counterparts to use the Internet for health information, according to a Pew Internet and American Life Project completed for the California HealthCare Foundation.
"The Internet Goes to College: How Students Are Living in the Future with Today's Technology." Pew Internet and American Life Project. September 15, 2002.
LAST AUGUST, the Pew Internet and American Life Project released a study titled "The Digital Disconnect: The Widening Gap Between Internet-Savvy Students and Their Schools."1 The Pew study prompted ZDNet News to release a Reuters story with the headline "Schools Get an 'F' in Tech Use."2 While this news may be disheartening, the story does warrant wide dissemination and considered discussion.
God is alive and well on the Net, suggests a survey by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Religious cruising, mostly for info, is more popular than gambling, banking, or trading stocks.
A survey by the Pew Internet and American Life Project last year found that 53 percent of online teens download music.
Demographically the Pew Internet and American Life Project report notes that for the first time since they have been tracking Internet shopping, more women than men shopped on-line in 2001.
A survey from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, Washington, D.C., found that people flock to malls and shopping centers for interaction they can't get from computers.
Typically, they use instant messaging to converse in text, but also share links, photos, music and video over IM, according to the Pew Internet and American Life Project.