ROGUE


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ROGUERegional OnBase Group of User Experts (Hyland Software users group; UK)
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References in classic literature ?
The Rogue may surely claim two merits, at least, in the eyes of the new generation--he is never serious for two moments together; and he "doesn't take long to read." W.
He wrote of thieves, pirates and rogues. These stories have the same show of truth as Robinson Crusoe.
Through Siskiyou County and across high mountains, they came to Ashland and Medford and camped beside the wild Rogue River.
"Nope, it ain't the valley of the moon," agreed Billy, and he said it on the evening of the day he hooked a monster steelhead, standing to his neck in the ice-cold water of the Rogue and fighting for forty minutes, with screaming reel, ere he drew his finny prize to the bank and with the scalp-yell of a Comanche jumped and clutched it by the gills.
The Rogue had got the clue he wanted, though he held it with a clumsy hand.
'You shall put it plain if you want it answered,' thought the Rogue, doggedly; 'I ain't a-going a wolunteering.'
The rogue, like the artist and perhaps the gentleman, belongs to no class.
And to be sure it would be better that all rogues were hanged out of the way, than that one honest man should suffer.
'Not by wrath but by laughter doth one kill'--thus spakest thou once, O Zarathustra, thou hidden one, thou destroyer without wrath, thou dangerous saint,--thou art a rogue!"
The rogues sat up the whole of the night before the day on which the procession was to take place, and had sixteen lights burning, so that everyone might see how anxious they were to finish the Emperor's new suit.
And now the Emperor, with all the grandees of his court, came to the weavers; and the rogues raised their arms, as if in the act of holding something up, saying, "Here are your Majesty's trousers!
The Emperor was accordingly undressed, and the rogues pretended to array him in his new suit; the Emperor turning round, from side to side, before the looking glass.