SACENDU

AcronymDefinition
SACENDUSouth African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use
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References in periodicals archive ?
South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) Update June 2016 [homepage on the Internet].
South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU): Monitoring alcohol, tobacco and other drug use-July 1996-June 2015.
The model boundaries also include 32 specialist treatment centres/programs that participate in the SACENDU project in the Western Cape [12, 21].
Parry et al., 'Monitoring alcohol and drug abuse trends in South Africa," SACENDU Research Brief, vol.
The South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU): Description, findings (1997-99) and policy implications.
However, in terms of participants recruited from centres participating in SACENDU, they do represent treatment providers working in centres seeing substantial numbers of patients who are treated for codeine-related problems.
Members of SACENDU meet every six months to provide community-level public health surveillance of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use trends and associated consequences through the presentation and discussion of various sources of quantitative and qualitative research data (Parry et al., 2002b).
South African Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) Update 27 November 2006.
Given that the 2010 SACENDU statistics reveal that heroin is the primary substance of abuse among 13% of substance abusers in the Western Cape Province, [2] it may be speculated that heroin-addicted pregnant patients are inadequately screened for, or are offered detoxification with only benzodiazepines and analgesics.
South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) Research brief; Cape Town, South Africa, 2014.
The "South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use" (SACENDU) reported that although alcohol remains the dominant substance of abuse in South Africa, cannabis and mandrax alone or in combination continue to be significant drugs of abuse.
[8] The most recent findings of the South African Community Epidemiological Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) revealed that, with the exception of one site, between 11% and 19% of patients being treated were <20 years of age.