SAMIS


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AcronymDefinition
SAMISSecurity Assistance Management Information System
SAMISSafety Management Information Statistics
SAMISShip Alternate Management Information System
SAMISStructural Analysis and Matrix Interpretive System
SAMISSolar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation
SAMISSupply Accounting Management Information System
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sami language education system is based on the Welsh one and they have their own broadcasting networks.
We met two members of the Sami Parliament, Christina Henriksen and Mariann Wollmann Maga.
However, there is one detailed map showing Sami territorial division in a large region in early modern times.
At that time, Swedish Sami were taxed according to a system established by Duke Charles (the future Charles IX) in 1602 (Gothe, 1929:44-62; Tegengren, 1952:46-49; Lundmark, 1982:88-95, 2006:40-45; Korpijaakko-Labba, 1994:352-354).
But the Samis can now raise their voices to be heard by the people who live below.
Long known as Lapps, a term they now disdain as colonial, the Samis number about: 80,000, with more than half in Norway and the rest in Sweden, Finland, and Russia.
The Sami are the traditional Native inhabitants of Lapland, which stretches across northern Norway, Sweden and Finland eastward into Russia.
In other areas, the Russian-Nordic divide acts as a constant external pressure that magnifies both positively and negatively the urban-rural divide within the Russian Sami community.
Although the Sami are believed to have once occupied most of Finland and large parts of the Scandinavian Peninsula, the different nation-states that slowly emerged in the area had a significant impact on Sami livelihoods and way of life.
To speak about creation in the northern Sami language, therefore, has strong associations of being the receiver of God's blessings, God's gifts.
Some of the oldest interviewees have previously provided information for other documentation projects and are known to possess an almost endless knowledge of traditional Sami life.
The myth led to the doctrine of unregistered ground in Finnmark that made nomadic Sami land public territory as part of the government's Norwegianization program to reduce cultural pluralism in Sapmi [Lapland].