SAMMPRIS

AcronymDefinition
SAMMPRISStenting Vs. Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis
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References in periodicals archive ?
All of the 3 studies reported any stroke (including ischemic stroke and hemorrhage stroke) within 30 days, and the SAMMPRIS and VISSIT trials also reported any stroke within 1 year and during the follow-up.
The SAMMPRIS and VISSIT trials reported the ischemic stroke as serious adverse events within 30 days and during the follow-up, including ischemic stroke in the territory of qualifying symptomatic artery and ischemic stroke not in the territory of qualifying symptomatic artery and cerebral infarction.
The SAMMPRIS and VISSIT trials reported the intracranial hemorrhage as serious adverse events during the follow-up, including intracranial hematoma, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage.
The SAMMPRIS and VISSIT trials reported any death within 30 days, beyond 30 days, between 30 days and within 1 year, within 1 year, and during the follow-up.
The SAMMPRIS and VISSIT trials reported the myocardial infarction during follow-up.
The SAMMPRIS trial was the first randomized trial to compare PTAS plus medical therapy with medical therapy alone.
In the SAMMPRIS trial stenting was performed under general anaesthesia.
Results of the SAMMPRIS trial were published last fall in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Data Source: The SAMMPRIS study, a randomized clinical trial involving 451 patients who were treated at 50 U.S.
SAMMPRIS was an investigator-initiated, randomized, double-blind, multi-center clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and conducted at 50 sites in the United States.
SAMMPRIS enrolled 451 patients at 50 sites across the United States.
[6] Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial Investigators, "Mechanisms of stroke after intracranial angioplasty and stenting in the SAMMPRIS trial," Neurosurgery, vol.