SELECT


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to SELECT: New Look
AcronymDefinition
SELECTSelenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial
SELECTSupporting Electronic Learning and Essential Campus Transitions (Louisiana Board of Regents)
SELECTSpecial Education Learning Experiences for Competency in Teaching (Arizona)
References in classic literature ?
There was happiness in that but it was tame compared to the novelty of being "select."
And the prince that lacks this skill lacks the essential which it is desirable that a captain should possess, for it teaches him to surprise his enemy, to select quarters, to lead armies, to array the battle, to besiege towns to advantage.
Pontellier had selected the bridal gift, as every one immediately connected with him always deferred to his taste in such matters.
As the select assemblies for choosing the President, as well as the State legislatures who appoint the senators, will in general be composed of the most enlightened and respectable citizens, there is reason to presume that their attention and their votes will be directed to those men only who have become the most distinguished by their abilities and virtue, and in whom the people perceive just grounds for confidence.
The party--some twenty--had been selected by Sviazhsky from among the more active new liberals, all of the same way of thinking, who were at the same time clever and well bred.
The dogs selected for Jerry's ancestors had been the brave ones, the up-standing and out-dashing ones, who flew into the face of danger and battled and died, but who never gave ground.
So he took his axe to the forest, and selected some stout, straight saplings, which he cut down and trimmed of all their twigs and leaves.
They had recently seen a chosen army from that country, which, reverencing as a mother, they had blindly believed invincible--an army led by a chief who had been selected from a crowd of trained warriors, for his rare military endowments, disgracefully routed by a handful of French and Indians, and only saved from annihilation by the coolness and spirit of a Virginian boy, whose riper fame has since diffused itself, with the steady influence of moral truth, to the uttermost confines of Christendom.* A wide frontier had been laid naked by this unexpected disaster, and more substantial evils were preceded by a thousand fanciful and imaginary dangers.
He himself selected from among those with the least disreputable look, two guards whom he had formerly known, and whose only faults were being drunkards and gamblers.
Such occasions, however, rarely occur and are perhaps not characteristic of Hesiod's genius: if we would see Hesiod at his best, in his most natural vein, we must turn to such a passage as that which he himself -- according to the compiler of the "Contest of Hesiod and Homer" -- selected as best in all his work, `When the Pleiades, Atlas' daughters, begin to rise...'
It is formed of rough stones, selected with care, and laid in courses or circles, with much compactness, but without cement of any kind.
Suppose, then, the convention had been inclined to proceed upon the principle of a repartition of the objects of revenue, between the Union and its members, in PROPORTION to their comparative necessities; what particular fund could have been selected for the use of the States, that would not either have been too much or too little too little for their present, too much for their future wants?