SPORES


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Related to SPORES: Bacterial spores
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SPORESStructure Prediction with Online Resources
References in periodicals archive ?
The spores are actually incredibly hardy, says Mole, because they're metabolically dormant.
However, when spores take on water, they almost immediately return to their original shape.
In numerous regions, these conditions occur when there is no susceptible host tissue available and the spores do not survive once released in absence of susceptible host tissue.
The prototype generators work by harnessing the movement of a sheet of rubber coated on one side with spores. The sheet bends when it dries out, much as a pine cone opens as it dries or a freshly fallen leaf curls, and then straightens when humidity rises.
In the experiment, they slathered bacterial spores on one side of a sheet of rubber,a dn when the sheet dried it curled up.
The spores can live for years in soil, but people can only get anthrax if they come into contact with the spores in one of three ways.
Spores of Gigaspora decipiens (Hall and Abbott) and Glomus clarum (Nicolson and Schenck) were multiplied in Brachiaria decumbens (Stapf and Prain) plants grown in pots containing a sand and clay (2:1, v [v.sup.-1]) substrate, pH 5.0 to 5.5, and maintained in a greenhouse for 3 months.
The topics include the gene regulation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, the structure and composition of the outer layers of the bacterial spore, the degradation of spore peptidoclycan during germination, anthrax disease as a paradigm for the sport as an infectious agent, and properties and detection methods of Bacilli spores in food and in medical settings.
Scientists at The Ohio State University set out to enhance the lethality of PATP against pressure- and heat-resistant spores of B.
Fungal spores are currently causing havoc and misery for allergy sufferers.