SSINA

AcronymDefinition
SSINASpecialty Steel Industry of North America
References in periodicals archive ?
In testimony submitted earlier this year to the House Ways & Means Committee, SSINA officials demanded to know why the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has not pursued a more aggressive policy against Chinese companies that export stainless steel to the United States.
previously entered into bilateral agreements with respect to stainless steel producers in Japan, Italy and France, to ensure that imports from those producers did not contain Cuban nickel," said SSINA Chairman Sunil Widge, who's also senior vice-president at Carpenter Technology in Reading, Pa.
With Schilling taking the point, SSINA recommends that Uncle Sam work with industry to create "an industrial policy that levels the 'investment' playing field, thereby encouraging investment in America.
Moreover, SSINA says, "Congress and the Administration should closely monitor the behavior of strategic trading partners like China to ensure that U.
An SSINA spokesperson said the rise in imports was due to the fact that imported steel was priced below market value and its producers are subsidized by their home governments.
market with little variance in the percentages," says SSINA chairman Paul A.
In the meantime, though, the SSINA says stainless steel imports continue to pour into North America.
Ferritic grades are magnetic, though they are not heat-hardened, and are used in automotive exhaust lines, architectural trim and cooking utensils, according to the SSINA.
Austenitic grades, such as 304, 310, 316 and 317, are used in roofs and gutters, kitchen sinks and chemical vessels, according to the SSINA.
SSINA believes that this measure is consistent with the international legal obligations of the United States at the International Monetary Fund and at the World Trade Organization and would appropriately and firmly convey that any country's fundamental misalignment and undervaluation of its currency will not be tolerated.
SSINA is a Washington, DC-based trade association representing virtually all continental specialty metals producers.
Shilling refers to a recently published SSINA report, Specialty Metals and the National Defense, which addresses the competitiveness issue as not only critical to job growth and the economy, but -- particularly in the case of the U.