STOP-NIDDM

AcronymDefinition
STOP-NIDDMStudy to Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus
References in periodicals archive ?
Gomis et al., "Acarbose treatment and the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: the STOP-NIDDM trial," JAMA, vol.
Acarbose for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus: The STOP-NIDDM randomised trial.
Because these agents target postprandial hyperglycemia, their cardioprotective effect may be similar to other compounds which reduce postmeal glucose excursions such as acarbose in the STOP-NIDDM trial.
Chiasson et al., "Single nucleotide polymorphisms of PPARD in combination with the Gly482Ser substitution of PGC-1A and the Pro12Ala substitution of PPARG2 predict the conversion from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes: the STOP-NIDDM trial," Diabetes, vol.
(16.) Chiasson J-L, Josse RG, Gomis R, Hanefeld M, Karasik A, Laakso M for The STOP-NIDDM Trial Research Group.
The STOP-NIDDM trial was one of several pointing to the importance of post-prandial glucose values, which have until recently received less attention than fasting glucose.
STOP-NIDDM was one of several recent studies pointing to the importance of postprandial glucose values, which have until recently received less attention than fasting glucose.
STOP-NIDDM was an international randomized trial in which 1,368 patients with impaired glucose tolerance were randomized to acarbose--an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that delays glucose absorption--or placebo.
The impetus for MERIA lay in the favorable results of the Study to Prevent Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (STOP-NIDDM) trial, which showed that acarbose lowered the rate of cardiovascular events in patients with insulin resistance (JAMA 290[4]:486-94, 2003).
Zeymer focused on a secondary end point of the STOP-NIDDM (Study to Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) trial.
Assessment of the effects of therapy aimed at lowering PPG in the Study to Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (STOP-NIDDM) trial (19) indicated that treatment with acarbose (100 mg administered 3 times per day) was associated with decreased risk for silent MI vs placebo in patients with impaired glucose tolerance.
He presented a new secondary analysis of data from the Study to Prevent Noninsulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (STOP-NIDDM) trial.