STSW

AcronymDefinition
STSWStore Status Word
STSWSoftware Transformation Systems Workshop (Canada)
STSWSecondary Treated Sewage Water
References in periodicals archive ?
It was possible to delimit three water masses in the region, in the winter: Continental water (CW), being well oxygenated, cold with lower salinity; Subantarctic Shelf Water (SASW), being also well oxygenated, cold with low salinity and high silicate; and Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), being less oxygenated, warmer and more saline than the CW and the SASW (Figure 6a).
The abiotic data show the presence of three different water masses in the region, mainly in the winter: Continental water (CW), being well oxygenated, cold and presenting the lowest salinity and high silicate; Subantarctic Shelf water (SASW), being also well oxygenated, cold with low salinity; and Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), being less oxygenated, warmer and more saline than the CW and the SASW.
The seasonality and reach of these water masses are responsible for the environment formed in the sediment, that in turn, propitiates the establishment of benthic species of Foraminifera in 8 groups: Continental Water (CW) species, organisms of continental origin, estuaries and salt marshes, and species related to the plume of the Plata River and the Patos Lagoon, and other estuarine systems like Laguna and Itajai-Acu as well (PPW), Subantarctic Shelf Water (SASW), Malvinas currents (MC), Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), Tropical Water (TW), South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF).
In the Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW) (where T > 12[degrees]C and S > 34.5) the main species are Globocassidulina subglobosa, Uvigerina peregrina, and Hanzawaia boueana (TW) that occur mainly to the north of Rio Grande (31.5[degrees]S) in areas deeper than 20 m.
Bulimina marginata occurring between Punta del Este (34.8[degrees]S) and Rio Grande (31.5[degrees]S), with peak of occurrence in Punta Del Diablo (33[degrees]S) in 41 m deep is the only characteristic species of the Subtropical Shelf Front, capable of adapting to the high variability dynamics in the transitional area where two coastal water masses (STSW and SASW) meet, and also still receives great seasonally influence from the Patos Lagoon and the Plata River.
The abiotic data were able to distinguish the presence of three different water masses in the region, mainly in the winter: Continental water (CW), being well oxygenated, cold and presenting the lowest salinity and high silicate; Subantarctic Shelf water (SASW), being also well oxygenated, cold with low salinity and high nutrients; and Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), being less oxygenated, warmer and more saline than the CW and the SASW.