SVJ

AcronymDefinition
SVJSchool Voor Journalistiek (Dutch: School of Journalism)
SVJSerious and Violent Juvenile (criminal justice)
SVJScience & Vie Junior (French: Science and Life Junior; journal)
SVJSmart Valley Japan
SVJStichting Vervolgingsslachtoffers Jappenkamp (Dutch: Foundation for Japanese Concentration Camp Victims; Netherlands)
SVJStanding Vertical Jump (athletic training test)
SVJSilicon Valley Judo (California)
SVJSouth Valley Journal (news publication; Utah)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Now Lamborghini has decided to up the ante by introducing a convertible version of it called the SVJ Roadster.
Lamborghini also got bragging rights after an Aventador SVJ was the latest production car to set the record for quickest lap at the famed Nrburgring-Nordschleife circuit in Germany.
The Aventador SVJ, where SV historically stands for Superveloce - meaning 'superfast' - takes the 'Jota' suffix, denoting its track and performance superiority.
With 770bhp and 720 Nm of torque at 6,750 rpm, the Aventador SVJ is the most powerful, naturallyaspirated series production V12 that Lamborghini has ever produced.
We observed that the level of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in normal mice was C57BL/6 > (A/J= 129X1/ SvJ) > C3H/HeJ > ICR > FVB > BALB/c > DBA/1 > DBA/2.
Above: The Hirai box clutch, SVJ by Sanya V Jain, ` 8000.
Alle vorn genannten wepsischen Worter werden mit 'Tochterchen' und/oder 'Fraulein/Madchen' ubersetzt, zumal diese Bedeutungen sich teilweise decken, kann damit auch ein Madchen oder eine junge Frau, die keine leibliche Tochter sein muss, von einer alteren Person angesprochen werden (Kettunen 1922 I : 125, II : 60-61; SVJ 590).
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the BS model and three other major alternative models: 1) the jump diffusion (JD) model, 2) the stochastic volatility (SV) model, and 3) the stochastic volatility and jump diffusion (SVJ) model using a different, but more appropriate approach.
(15) Noting that there have been peaks and valleys in recent years in youth violence and that the overall homicide rate for all age groups "is beginning to decline again," (16) the increase in youth violence that occurred between 1983 and 1993 provoked an institutional response that has "changed the contours of juvenile corrections." (17) The change that Gaes discusses is the phenomenon of increasing numbers of serious and violent juvenile offenders (SVJ) in state juvenile correctional facilities.
Identifying the skill of a serious and violent juvenile offender (SVJ) to manage his emotional state is important for intervention and rehabilitation, especially when the offender uses crime as a strategy in coping with a negative emotional state.