SMHM

(redirected from Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse)
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AcronymDefinition
SMHMSchool of Merchandising and Hospitality Management (University of North Texas)
SMHMSalt Marsh Harvest Mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris)
SMHMSentara Mental Health Management (Norfolk, VA)
References in periodicals archive ?
This phase will include designing plans to restore 1,300 acres of tidal wetlands, improving flood protection and habitat for endangered species, such as the Ridgways rail and salt marsh harvest mouse. EPA also awarded a combined $878,245 to the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to protect and restore water quality in and around the bay.
The salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) is an endangered species endemic to pickle-weed-dominated habitat along the fringes of tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay estuary.
A California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) passes warily under the boardwalk while a salt marsh harvest mouse (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) clings to a clump of pickleweed just a few feet away.
Those ponds once hosted vegetation like cordgrass, gumplant and salty, bitter pickleweed, which in turn provide homes for rails and the salt marsh harvest mouse, also listed as endangered.
It puts Roger Hawes of Hereford in the same "protected species" bracket as the Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse, the Long-Beaked Enchida, the Estuarine Crocodile and the Oriental Stork.
On the 1/2-mile Baylands Trail to view the replanted pickleweed marsh (home to the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse), you might spot avocets and snowy egrets poking around the shallows, as well as cinnamon teal, gadwalls, and rudd ducks in deeper water.
The salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) is an endangered species endemic to pickleweed-dominated habitat along the fringes of tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay estuary.
The salt marsh harvest mouse is a small nocturnal rodent that makes its home and all of its meals out of pick-leweed (Salicornia virginica), a native plant growing in the salt marshes.
Nobles adds, "It's a chance to replace 80 percent of wetlands previously lost, restore the entire areas ecology, and almost certainly delist at least two endangered species, the California dapper rail and the salt marsh harvest mouse."
You're more likely to see two endangered species (clapper rail and salt marsh harvest mouse) here than in any other part of the refuge.
The goal is to bring back native pickleweed-dominated vegetation, which is habitat for the salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) and California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus), two endangered species in the greater San Francisco Bay estuary.
Migrating waterfowl and shorebirds abound this month, and seasonally high tides are likely to flush into view some selfom-seen marsh denizens such as the clapper rail and the salt marsh harvest mouse (both endangered).