SMWT

(redirected from Self-Managed Work Team)
AcronymDefinition
SMWTSix Minute Walk Test
SMWTSelf-Managed Work Team
SMWTSouthern Maryland Wood Treating (St. Mary's County, MD; US EPA)
SMWTSinging Men of West Texas (Midland, TX)
References in periodicals archive ?
The hierarchical way in which the solution was devised and imposed also damaged the autonomy of the self-managed work team. In this instance, problem solving, and sustainability of the GH model, was influenced by the nature of the problem (requiring a quick solution); leadership (showing limited support for the model); and the regulatory environment (reinforcing traditional nursing home management techniques).
Self-managed work teams are groups of employees tasked with monitoring and reviewing a product or process in a firm and coming up with solutions to problems they encounter.
With the self-managed work team there is less need for the traditional approach to supervision which allows the organization to operate with span of control ratios of 50:1 and higher.
Preparation is basic to the success of any self-managed work team. Just as nurse managers cannot become leaders in the new health care environment without adequate training, staff members cannot function in self-managed teams without preparation.
During this period he analyzed the existing operating approach, proposed a self-managed work team design, and then worked directly with the core management team to facilitate their preparation for the change.
It is a versatile tool that can be used in a variety of work environments and has fit well into the self-managed work team culture at Boeing.
All team building workshops were of three-day duration; the participants were undergoing the training to develop skill to work as members of self-managed work teams. In total, 492 rural development professionals in 110 teams participated in the study of which 58 had 4 members each and 52 had 5 members each.
"Self-Managed Work Teams: Reality or Fad?" Material Handling Management April: 15-22.
However, several studies (Rossman, 1986; Stokes and Stewart, 1991; Zawacki and Lackow, 1998) offered several suggestions to avoid "the pitfalls" of computerization, and one of the suggestions was to gain employee support by soliciting input from them by forming self-managed work teams. Self-managed work teams are groups of employees (5-12) with all the technical skills and the authority needed to direct and manage themselves (Dumaine, 1997; Forrester and Drexler, 1999).
These self-managed work teams are responsible for a predefined production level, but have some flexibility in how the work is organized and managed.
Promoting self-managed work teams: A workplace with self-managed work teams is one where all employees manage themselves.