SCEG

(redirected from Selig Center for Economic Growth)
AcronymDefinition
SCEGSouth Carolina Electric and Gas (also seen as SCE&G)
SCEGSuffolk Chief Executives Group (UK)
SCEGSelig Center for Economic Growth
SCEGSki Club of East Gippsland (Australia)
SCEGSmall Craft Expedition Group
SCEGSpeech Coding Experts Group
References in periodicals archive ?
They had $686 billion in spending power in 2004, and that's expected to approach $1 trillion in 2009, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business.
The Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia tracks the buying power of minorities, defined as personal income that is available, after taxes, for spending on goods and services (also known as disposable income).
The University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth at Terry College of Business predicts all ethnic markets will grow faster than the Caucasian market at least until 2008.
Colorado's Hispanic market is the eighth largest in the United States, according to a study by the Selig Center for Economic Growth, which is attracting the interest of big business.
From 1990 to 2002, Hispanic buying power in Arkansas increased from $173.84 million to $1.53 billion--a 777.6 percent gain and the second biggest spurt in the country, according to a report by the University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth. North Carolina led with 912.2 percent growth, rising from $870.93 million to $8.82 billion.
* Percentage share of total consumer buying power in the state, projected for 1999 Source: Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia
Right now, African-American consumers spend more than $1.2 trillion, according to the University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth.
Hispanics are expected to contribute $1.5 trillion in consumer purchase spending by 2015, according to "The Multicultural Economy Report, 2012" by the Selig Center for Economic Growth. Other research has found that Hispanics are spending $9.1 billion a year in the personal care category, and that Latinas are outspending general market women per retail visit, with 52% of Latinas spending $25 or more per visit, compared with only 41% of general market women.
African Americans wield $913 billion in buying power and that figure will grow to $1.2 trillion by 2013, according to data from the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.
The University of Georgia's Selig Center for Economic Growth projects that the nation's African-American buying power, which rose from $318 billion in 1990 to $585 billion in 2000 to $723 billion in 2004, will continue to rise to $965 billion by 2009, up 203% in 19 years.
By 2008, Hispanic buying power is expected be $1,014 billion--exceeding that of African Americans by almost $100 billion, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth, a demographic research organization in Athens, Ga.