SARI

(redirected from Severe Acute Respiratory Infection)
AcronymDefinition
SARISevere Acute Respiratory Infection
SARISouth Asia Regional Initiative
SARISupport against Racist Incidents (UK)
SARISavannah Agricultural Research Institute (Ghana)
SARISanta Ana River Interceptor
SARISalt River Bay National Historic Park and Ecological Preserve (US National Park Service)
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of influenza C viruses among outpatients and patients hospitalized for severe acute respiratory infection, Minnesota, 2013-2016.
Caption: MERS, a cousin of severe acute respiratory syndrome, is a respiratory agent that causes severe acute respiratory infections.
The WHO reiterates calls on member states to remain vigilant for cases of severe acute respiratory infections.
Based on the current situation and available information, WHO encourages all Member States to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.
The WHO urged member states to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.
"We follow the WHO recommendations and so far the health body has not issued any travel restrictions to those countries affected." Dr al-Hajri also said that surveillance was going on in the community as well as among the hospitalised cases for other respiratory illnesses that are being caused by a wide range of bacteria and viruses such as ILIs (influenza like illnesses) as well as SARI (severe acute respiratory infections).
WHO said it is encouraging all Member States to continue surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to review any unusual patterns.
A mission from WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and headquarters recently arrived in Amman to assist in further epidemiological surveillance and strengthen the sentinel surveillance systems for severe acute respiratory infections (SARIs).
The WHO urged all its member states to continue surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections.
The first known cases of MERS-CoV occurred during an outbreak of severe acute respiratory infections in Zarqa, Jordan, during March-April 2012 (1).
Based on the current situation and available information, WHO encourages all the Middle Eastern countries to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.
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