SGR

(redirected from Soft Gamma-ray Repeater)
AcronymDefinition
SGRSustainable Growth Rate
SGRStichting Garantiefonds Reisgelden (Dutch: Travel Compensation Fund Foundation)
SGRSocieta' di Gestione del Risparmio (Italian: Investment Management Company)
SGRSelect Graphic Rendition
SGRSmith, Gambrell & Russell (law firm; various locations)
SGRStargate Resistance (game)
SGRSmall Group Research (journal)
SGRSelous Game Reserve (Tanzania)
SGRSurgeon General's Report
SGRSpecific Growth Rate
SGRShale Gouge Ratio (algorithm)
SGRSoft Gamma-ray Repeater (high energy astrophysics)
SGRScientific Games Racing (various locations)
SGRSociety of Gastrointestinal Radiologists
SGRStrategic Grain Reserve
SGRSet Graphics Rendition
SGRSteam Generator Replacement
SGRScary-Go-Round (online comic strip)
SGRShin Getter Robo (science fiction)
SGRStained Glass Rose (D.A. Brockett novel)
SGRSystem Graduation Requirements (various universities)
SGRSortie Generation Rate
SGRSpectral Gamma Ray
SGRStem Girdling Roots
SGRSodium-Graphite Reactor
SGRStudents for Global Responsibility
SGRScientists for Global Responsibilty
SGRSegmented Gamma-Ray Scanner
SGRSelesa Golf Resort (Malaysia)
SGRSerrurerie Générale Rénovation (French: Locksmith General Renovation)
References in periodicals archive ?
One of only three bursters known to flash more than once, the so-called soft gamma-ray repeater discovered in Aquila in the late 1970s became active again in June, as reported in IAU Circular 5567.
Kulkarni and Frail began their study by searching astronomy catalogs for a radio-emitting counterpart to the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1806-20.
Scientists have suspected that these recurring emissions, known as soft gamma-ray repeaters because they have lower energy than the standard bursts, might stem from the activity of neutron stars.
There are just five so-called Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) known, four in the Milky Way and one in our satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Astronomers had identified five neutron stars, known as soft gamma-ray repeaters, as magnetars (SN: 9/12/98, p.
Editor's Note: The writer, working at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center on contract with University of Alabama at Huntsville, studied black-hole transients and soft gamma-ray repeaters with Compton's BATSE instrument team.
SGR 1900+14 and SGR 0526-66 belong to a class of stars known as soft gamma-ray repeaters because they sporadically emit low-energy gamma rays.