SCSL

(redirected from Special Court for Sierra Leone)
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AcronymDefinition
SCSLSpecial Court for Sierra Leone (UN)
SCSLSun Community Source License
SCSLScientific Computing Software Library
SCSLSouth Carolina State Library (Columbia, SC)
SCSLScientific Computing Software Library (Silicon Graphics, Inc.)
SCSLSupply Chain Systems Laboratory (College Station, Texas)
SCSLSun Community Source Licensing (Sun)
SCSLSatyam Computer Services Limited (Secunderabad, India)
SCSLSouth Coast Soccer League (Massachusetts)
SCSLStratocumulus Standing Lenticular (cloud)
SCSLSecure Computing and Simulation Laboratory
SCSLSteuben County Swim League (New York state)
SCSLSouth Carolina School of Leadership (Columbia, SC)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was set up two years ago by the United Nations and the government of Sierra Leone with the mandate to try those who "bear the greatest responsibility" of war crimes committed in the country since 30 November 1996.
Reports that the US president, George Bush, has set aside a $2m bounty for the capture of the former Liberian president, Charles Taylor, to stand trial at the UN Special Court for Sierra Leone, has angered the Nigeria government, forcing a presidential spokeswoman in Abuja to say Nigeria "will not succumb to intimidation from any quarter".
Justice Lenaola was appointed as a Judge of the Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone in November 2013.
The Nimba County Senator, who has been engaged by the former chief investigator of the defunct UN-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone, Allen White on atrocities committed in Liberia that could lead him to trial, says anyone, who thinks that they will create situation that will undermine the Weah Presidency, such person will be resisted by him and the people of Liberia.
Other innovations had been the formulation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established because of the horrendous nature of the atrocities committed during the war.
It looks at the International Criminal Court, International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, and Special Court for Sierra Leone, showing how witness testimony is key in these courts and discussing the witness-scheme, the practicalities involved and normative frameworks guaranteeing witness rights, and questions related to witness sourcing, proofing, familiarization, modeling, cost/inducement, protection, and international cooperation.
The Special Court for Sierra Leone closed after convicting former Liberian President Charles Taylor of fueling the conflict and conscripting child soldiers.
Taylor, who was charged and tried by the United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone ("SCSL "), was convicted in April 2013 for planning and aiding and abetting war crimes, crimes against humanity, and other serious international humanitarian law violations.
The Special Court for Sierra Leone made its final major decision on 26 September 2013 when its Appeals Chamber upheld the 50-year sentence handed down to former Liberian President Charles Taylor.
Crane, an ex-chief prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone and now head of the Syria Accountability Project, noted that a separate team of UN investigators had drawn up four confidential lists of war crimes suspects on all sides in Syria, but declined to reveal any names.
Crane, former Chief Prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone; and Dr.
On 15 October 2013, the former Liberian president, Charles Taylor, was sent to Britain to begin his 50-year prison sentence imposed by the Special Court for Sierra Leone. But bad treatment at Her Majesty's Prison (HMP) Frankland, in northeast England, and the British immigration authorities' refusal to grant his wife and children visas to visit him, have led to concerns being raised by his British barrister, who wants him transferred to Rwanda where, he believes, Taylor will receive appropriate conditions of imprisonment.
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