TENS


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AcronymDefinition
TENSTranscutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation (aka Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation)
TENSToxic Epidermal Necrolysis Syndrome (a form of Stevens Johnson Syndrome)
TENSTranscutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulator
TENSThe Episcopal Network for Stewardship (church leaders' association)
TENSTranscutane Elektrische Neuro Stimulatie (Danish: Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation)
TENSTelephone Emergency Notification System
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References in classic literature ?
Him fella Sati buy 'm slop chest along plantation two tens pounds and one fella pound.
Part of the property of the city of Telephonia consists of ten million poles, as many as would make a fence from New York to California, or put a stockade around Texas.
'Ten kisses from the Princess, or else I keep my pot.'
"Ten kisses from the Princess, or I keep the kitchen-pot myself."
Then ten fresh targets were brought forward, and every sound was hushed as the archers took their places once more.
On the march Tars Tarkas, through his remarkable ability and statesmanship, enlisted fifty thousand more warriors from various hordes, so that, ten days after we set out we halted at midnight outside the great walled city of Zodanga, one hundred and fifty thousand strong.
The town has eight thousand to ten thousand inhabitants.
"Ten fella three times, Billy," Sheldon said encouragingly, though there was a certain metallic rasp in his voice.
Ten truths must thou find during the day; otherwise wilt thou seek truth during the night, and thy soul will have been hungry.
D'Artagnan was not perhaps so gay this time as he would have been with the prospect of finding some good friends at Calais, instead of joining the ten scamps there; melancholy, however, did not visit him more than once a day, and it was about five visits that he received from that somber deity before he got sight of the sea at Boulogne, and then these visits were indeed but short.
If I took up my position "under the shadow of Saint Paul's," say, at ten that night, I should arrive at the place of meeting with two hours to spare, before the last stroke of the clock marked the beginning of the new month.
As ten o'clock struck, Michel Ardan, Barbicane, and Nicholl, took leave of the numerous friends they were leaving on the earth.