TPEA

AcronymDefinition
TPEATexas Public Employees Association
TPEAThompson Products Employees' Association
TPEATexas Professors of Educational Administration
TPEATransportation Planning Excellence Award
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References in periodicals archive ?
The TPEA had a better record in grievance handling and problem-solving.
TPEA representatives brought up proposals that either were rejected by management or resulted in joint policy announcements (on such topics as toilet facilities, drinking water, and cafeteria prices).
Thus, despite its limitations, the TPEA was more active than many of the company unions of the 1930s.
Passage of the Wagner Act did not affect the TPEA, but the Supreme Court's Jones & Laughlin Steel decision in April 1937 brought major changes.
Immediately after the Jones & Laughlin decision, Bill Hoffman met with Livingstone to discuss bringing the TPEA into compliance with the Wagner Act.
Roemisch changed the TPEA's name to the Automotive and Aircraft Workers' Association (AAWA), wrote a constitution for it, and incorporated the new organization with his own funds.
Over the next four years, the AAWA's monthly council meetings addressed the same types of problems as had the TPEA. Little was said about discipline and discharge.
But though it was tamer and more deferential to management than most national unions, the AAWA occasionally displayed an independence that the TPEA had lacked entirely.
The NLRB sustained these orders in August, finding that the AAWA was "merely an advisory agency supported by the management for adjusting differences with the employees within management limitations." More serious in the NLRB's eyes was the fact that the AAWA had growth out of the TPEA, an organization clearly initiated and controlled by management.
Just as the AAWA showed signs of greater independence than the TPEA, so too did the AWA become more autonomous and active than its predecessors.
A year after the TPEA was formed, it started a company union, but this was an ineffectual organization because Detroit management never gave employee relations, a high priority.