TREAT


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AcronymDefinition
TREATTherapeutics Research Education and AIDS Training in Asia (Foundation for AIDS Research)
TREATTrouble Report Evaluation and Analysis Tool
TREATTrees for the Evelyn and Atherton Tablelands (Australia)
TREATTransient Reactor Test
TREATTrust for Research and Education on the Arms Trade (est. 1990; UK)
TREATTransient Radar Test Facility
TREATThesis, Rule, Explanation, Analysis, Thesis (law study)
References in classic literature ?
I paid the money over, received the bill of sale, and French Frank treated. This struck me as an evident custom, and a logical one--the seller, who receives, the money, to wet a piece of it in the establishment where the trade was consummated.
I pretended not to be interested in what they said, and treated them as if I did not under- stand them; for I feared they might be treacherous.
When Lady Bellaston heard the young lord's scruples, she treated them with the same disdain with which one of those sages of the law, called Newgate solicitors, treats the qualms of conscience in a young witness.
On which the duke observed, "Sancho is quite right, and there is no reason at all to find fault with him; Dapple shall be fed to his heart's content, and Sancho may rest easy, for he shall be treated like himself."
He had the reputation of being a clever man, had been there some three months waiting for his trial to come on, and would have to wait as much longer; but he was quite domesticated and contented, since he got his board for nothing, and thought that he was well treated.
"No," answered the fisherman, "if I trust myself to you I am afraid you will treat me as a certain Greek king treated the physician Douban.
Ojo must go to prison with the Soldier with the Green Whiskers, but he will be well treated and you need not worry about him."
"I'm good f'ler, girls, an' if an'body treats me right I--here," called he through an open door to a waiter, "bring girls drinks, damn it.
This fundamental subject of Natural Selection will be treated at some length in the fourth chapter; and we shall then see how Natural Selection almost inevitably causes much Extinction of the less improved forms of life and induces what I have called Divergence of Character.
The parts of Tragedy which must be treated as elements of thc whole have been already mentioned.
There are then three parts of domestic government, the masters, of which we have already treated, the fathers, and the husbands; now the government of the wife and children should both be that of free persons, but not the [I259b] same; for the wife should be treated as a citizen of a free state, the children should be under kingly power; for the male is by nature superior to the female, except when something happens contrary to the usual course of nature, as is the elder and perfect to the younger and imperfect.
In Ionia and the islands the epic poets followed the Homeric tradition, singing of romantic subjects in the now stereotyped heroic style, and showing originality only in their choice of legends hitherto neglected or summarily and imperfectly treated. In continental Greece (1), on the other hand, but especially in Boeotia, a new form of epic sprang up, which for the romance and PATHOS of the Ionian School substituted the practical and matter-of-fact.