VERBS


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Related to VERBS: Action verbs
AcronymDefinition
VERBSVentricular Endocardial Right Bifocal Stimulation
VERBSVisual Evoked Response Binocular Summation
References in classic literature ?
Language in general includes the following parts:- Letter, Syllable, Connecting word, Noun, Verb, Inflexion or Case, Sentence or Phrase.
Yet even the German books are not entirely free from attacks of the Parenthesis distemper--though they are usually so mild as to cover only a few lines, and therefore when you at last get down to the verb it carries some meaning to your mind because you are able to remember a good deal of what has gone before.
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
But the verb, the verb," obstinately insisted Pelisson.
it was not a letter but a character, standing for a Latin verb,
Its root is that of the verb "rotisya," to bind oneself by an oath; and it is generally admitted to be only another form of "rota," which now signifies a "regimental company.
differences between the Indian and the English modes of constructing words; and, having once got a clew to this, he pursued every noun and verb he could think of through all possible variations.
15) Such seems to be the meaning indicated by the context, though the verb is taken by Allen and Sikes to mean, `to be like oneself', and so `to be original'.
Give me the verb `to be,' potential mood, past perfect tense.
Mary Anne immediately hooked her right arm behind her in her left hand--an attitude absolutely necessary to the situation--and replied: 'One is indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, verb active to say.
To look" is a feeble verb indeed to express the unexpected shock of beauty to which I was suddenly exposed.
As that gentleman happened at the moment to be staring me squarely in the face as I stood by the roadside it was not altogether clear whether he was addressing me or his beasts; nor could I say if they were named Fuddy and Duddy and were both subjects of the imperative verb "to gee-up.