VERSE


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AcronymDefinition
VERSEVerbal Expressions Rejecting Society's Expectations (Normal, Illinois)
VERSEVertical Rail Stiffness Equipment
VERSEVariable Rate Selective Excitation (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
References in classic literature ?
In a seven-syllable verse the odd syllables can have any tone; as regards the even syllables, when the second syllable is even, then the fourth is oblique, and the sixth even.
There is also a break or caesura which in five-syllable verses falls after the second syllable and in seven-syllable verses after the fourth.
It is quite certain that he could not read Latin, so that all that he put into verse had to be taught to him by some more learned brother.
And," we are told, "his songs and his verse were so winsome to hear, that his teachers themselves wrote and learned from his mouth.
It was in some hundreds of verses, which I did my best to balance as Pope did, with a caesura falling in the middle of the line, and a neat antithesis at the end.
In the last paragraph of the Prologue, verse 7, Zarathustra gives us a foretaste of his teaching concerning the big and the little sagacities, expounded subsequently.
And to begin," continued La Fontaine, following up his idea, "I will go and burn a hundred verses I have just made.
But with successive Latin, Medieval, and Renaissance writers in verse and prose the country characters and setting had become mere disguises, sometimes allegorical, for the expression of the very far from simple sentiments of the upper classes, and sometimes for their partly genuine longing, the outgrowth of sophisticated weariness and ennui, for rural naturalness.
These three books," said the curate, "are the best that have been written in Castilian in heroic verse, and they may compare with the most famous of Italy; let them be preserved as the richest treasures of poetry that Spain possesses.
When they came to recite their lessons, not one of them knew his verses perfectly, but had to be prompted all along.
But the author himself took the verses and began reading them aloud.
It is said that when Homer had recited these verses, they were so admired by the Greeks as to be called golden by them, and that even now at public sacrifices all the guests solemnly recite them before feasts and libations.