VRAS

AcronymDefinition
VRASVoice Recognition and Synthesis
VRASVariable Room Acoustics System
VRASVirtual Reality Audio System (Japan International Broadcasting, Inc.)
VRASVantage Remote Access System (software)
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Ghana electricity is run by three utility companies: the Volta River Authority (VRA), Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) and Ghana Grid Company (GRIDCo).
government also attempted to protect the domestic steel and auto industries from foreign competition through voluntary restraint agreements (VRAs), which increased tariffs or imposed import quotas on foreign imports.
The proposed rule would also allow beneficiaries to be served by their state VRA and an EN, thus eliminating some of the conflicts (existing under the old rules) between private providers and state agencies.
But VRAs and Section 301 sanctions are now GATT-illegal, and we have a dispute settlement mechanism that will say so.
government to negotiate a series of voluntary restraint agreements (VRAs) and trigger price mechanism schemes.
At the level of primary Party organizations and villages, the impetus has come from the state's encouragement of competitive elections to village committees, which originated in the 1987 Organic Law of Villagers' Committees, and the Village Representative Assemblies (VRAs), established in 1990 to monitor the activities of the executive committees.
antidumping and antisubsidy laws have also been the spawning ground for many other trade restrictions, including the steel VRAs negotiated during the 1980s and the U.S.
Voluntary Restraint Agreements (VRAs) are another barrier to trade that the Japanese would like to eliminate.
Ronald Reagan imposed import quotas, formally termed "voluntary restraint agreements" (VRAs), on most major steel-exporting nations.
Trade friction has led to increased Japanese use of voluntary export restraints (VERs) and participation in voluntary restraint agreements (VRAs).
Voluntary restraint arrangements (VRAs) are prominent as a means of restricting imports in certain sectors, covering nearly 9 per cent of total imports in 1990, down from a peak of nearly 11 per cent in 1986.(25) Besides their obvious trade-restraining impact, VRAs encourage anti-competitive actions by foreign firms which could, were it not for official compulsion, be prosecuted under U.S.