VTMC

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AcronymDefinition
VTMCVictor Talking Machine Company (RCA, 1901 - 1929)
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: In 1929, RCA bought the Victor Talking Machine Company, then the world's largest manufacturer of records, including its showcase Victrola line.
Additionally, Caruso found his way into the home through the Victor Talking Machine Company. Frasca provides a brief history of the gramophone and phonograph and outlines how the Victor Talking Machine Company's use of Caruso as a marketing tool shifted the American perception of Italian immigrants.
Middleton, who founded the Victor Talking Machine Company (today RCA Victor).
Operations in the new factory had barely gotten underway when legal problems with the Victor Talking Machine Company began to arise.
In the 1910s, no other company was as influential in music appreciation classes as the Victor Talking Machine Company of Camden, New Jersey.
Soon after the Victor Talking Machine Company was founded, they established a licensing agreement with the Gramophone and Typewriter Company in England (known at various times as G&T, The Gramophone Company, and HMV), and their affiliates on the Continent.
And he details the emergence of the Victor Talking Machine Company, founded in 1901, which produced both 78 rpm discs (burying Thomas Edison's recorded cylinders) and the majority of the devices that made it possible for ordinary people to hear, say, the superstar tenor Enrico Caruso.
His collection, featuring artifacts from the 1880s to the 1930s, includes Thomas Edison inventions such as the first cylinder recordings and a gooseneck oak horn from the Edison home (circa 1901), as well as the Victor Talking Machine Company's Berliner Gramophone (circa 1895), featured in the famous company logo with Victor's black-and-white dog Nipper.
For example, while the Victor Talking Machine Company dominated the market due to its stellar lineup of musical celebrities and customer preference for Victor's disc technology over Edison's cylinders, neither technology nor advertising strategy could account completely for the success and popularity of one song over any other.
The Victor Talking Machine Company, and its descendent RCA Victor, was the most important American recording company during the 78 rpm era.
He begins with a discussion of the circumstances surrounding Caruso's first recordings for the Gramophone and Typewriter Company (G&T), the Anglo-Italian Commerce Company (AICC), and Disco Zonofono, plus details of his various contractual arrangements with the Victor Talking Machine Company. Bolig's chapter on Caruso's published recordings offers many details on sales of these releases in various parts of the world, both in original form and on reissues, the electrical "re-recordings" with symphony orchestra, private issues primarily of unpublished material, and pirate releases.