VFP

(redirected from Vocal Fold Paresis)
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AcronymDefinition
VFPVisual FoxPro (Microsoft development environment)
VFPVector Floating Point
VFPVirtual Function Pointer
VFPVisual Fox Pro
VFPVideo Fine Processor (DVD players)
VFPLight Photographic Squadron (US Navy aviation unit designation used from 1956 to 1987)
VFPPhotographic Reconnaissance Squadron (US Navy aviation unit designation used from 1956 to 1987)
VFPVenous Foot Pump (podiatry)
VFPVocal Fold Paresis
VFPVirtual File Platform (Hitachi)
VFPVote for Pedro (game)
VFPVoluntary Filing Program (US SEC)
VFPVeterans for Peace, Inc.
VFPVending Facility Program (blind support program; est. 1936)
VFPVisiting Faculty Position
VFPVertical Forms Printing
VFPLight Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (US Navy aviation unit designation used from 1956 to 1987)
VFPPhotographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) (US Navy aviation unit designation used from 1956 to 1987)
VFPVariance Frequency Processor
VFPVery Fast People (Italy)
VFPPhotographic Squadron, Light
VFPVlaamse Federatie voor Planologie (Dutch: Flemish Federation for Planning; Belgium)
References in periodicals archive ?
Sataloff, "The Prevalence of Undiagnosed Thyroid Disease in Patient with Symptomatic Vocal Fold Paresis," Journal of Voice 25, no.
After a comprehensive neurolaryngologic evaluation, initial therapy for a paresis podule should be directed at the vocal fold paresis.
Wide variability (33 to 100%) exists regarding the ability of laryngeal EMG to accurately predict vocal fold paresis and recovery of vocal fold function.
These exercises were designed to regain the independence of my speech muscles, to relieve a slight right vocal fold paresis, and to relieve the droopiness of one side of my mouth.
A great many causes of dysphonia exist, including voice abuse or misuse, congenital malformations of the vocal folds such as sulcus vocalis, laryngopharyngeal reflux, hypothyroidism or other endocrine dysfunction, vocal fold paresis or paralysis, papillomatosis, laryngeal cancer, and many others.
During the immediate postoperative period, patients were evaluated for airway compromise, hematoma, and vocal fold paresis.
In our patient, botulinum toxin injection did lead to subclinical changes noticed on stroboscopic examination beginning 2 weeks postoperatively in the form of vocal fold paresis.
Based on the findings of an office laryngoscopy, she was diagnosed with vocal fold paresis.
A later evaluation identified glottic insufficiency, which was attributed to vocal fold paresis based on laryngoscopy.
Posterior congenital glottic webs are rare; when they do occur, they may mimic vocal fold paresis and necessitate visualization of the posterior airway without an endotracheal tube.
The patient also had muscle tension dysphonia, arytenoid erythema and edema consistent with reflux, and evidence of fight vocal fold paresis.
His facial nerve function had returned to its preoperative state (grade II), and his left vocal fold paresis had completely resolved.