WUDL

AcronymDefinition
WUDLWestern Ultra Deep Levels (3-D seismic survey)
References in periodicals archive ?
(2.) Sariciftci, NS, Smilowitz, L, Heeger, AJ, Wudl, F, "Photo-induced Electron Transfer from a Conducting Polymer to Buckminsterfullerene." Science, 258 1474-1476 (1992)
Wudl, "Relative electron donor strengths of tetrathiafulvene derivatives: effects of chemical substitutions and the molecular environment from a combined photoelectron and electrochemical study," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
As it turned out, the Wudl team discovered that Meng's material--a polymer that formed in the jar when the stored monomers linked up--conducted electricity better than commercially available versions of the same polythiophene.
"One application for Automend could be for making large lenses, because if cracked the repair would be transparent and would not deform," Wudl said.
Friedman sought the help of Fred Wudl, a fullerene expert at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who fashioned a water-soluble version with two charged arms to grasp the protease's binding site.
Wudl, "Organic electronics from perylene to organic photovoltaics: painting a brief history with a broad brush," Journal of Materials Chemistry, vol.
After receiving his PhD in 1994, Hicks spent two years as an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow working with Fred Wudl at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where his research activities spanned synthetic organic chemistry, charge transfer salts, electrochemistry, and fullerenes.
Organic chemist Fred Wudl says his group at the University of California, Santa Barbara, can add up to six carbon atoms, one at a time, to a buckyball without destroying the molecule's soccerball shape or properties.
Fred Wudl, an organic chemist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, echoes Whetten's cautions optimism.
Wudl, "Carbon allotropes: beyond graphite and diamond," Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, vol.
After observing half a dozen reactions between fullerenes and other chemicals, organic chemist Fred Wudl of the University of California, Santa Barbara, reports that fullerenes "love electrons" and bond easily with substances that readily give them up.
Foote of UCLA, and Fred Wudl of the University of California, Santa Barbara, in a letter in the Dec.